Hikaru Jacket

Hikaru Jacket

Hikaru

Meaning: Light & Radient –
Hasu Down Jacket

Using 700 Fill with a 90/10 down/feather count the Hikaru Down Jacket is very light, generally less than 0.5kg and with a very high goose down count of 700 Fill the jacket remains extremely warm, with 3 layer’s on the surface fabric and a dual layer on the lining to prevent feathers showing and also remain windproof and water tight.
The Hikaru uses 90 separate chambers in the construction of the jacket to keep the down in place and make sure that it remains well distributed. The back body panel alone has 13 separate chambers.

Hikaru comes with lambskin on the corners of all pockets. All pockets are also lined with micro fleece for warmth. The front zip has double flaps to keep warmth locked in and the neck has a fully fleeced chin and neck support for added comfort.

 

 

Formandfunction

Buying a down Jacket

Down Jackets have always been a popular type of jacket, especially in cold seasons and in places where the temperature is low most of the time. These jackets have a reputation for their good insulation ability, light weight, and durability. However, the quality of a down jacket needs to be good if its advantage is to be enjoyed to the maximum. In this guide, five tips are given to the buyer to use when shopping for a down jacket to help make a good purchase that will deliver the all the benefits that these jackets offer.

What is a Down Jacket?

A down jacket is a warm jacket that is filled with the soft feathers of a duck or goose, and the outer layer is usually made of materials like nylon or polyester. Down, the soft feathers mentioned, are usually taken from the breasts and wings of the duck or goose. Down is the material which provides the insulation that makes down jackets so warm, as they retain heat inside the jacket. Generally, the more fluffy the down is inside the jacket, the more air gets trapped inside the jacket, and the higher the ability of the jacket to keep out the cold. However, today, most down jackets are not made of pure down, and are often mixed with other materials, such as feathers.

Take Note of the Jacket’s Fill Power

A down jacket’s fill power is a number that represents the fluffiness of the jacket. In more accurate terms, it is the number of cubic inches of the jacket that one ounce of down fills up. A bigger number usually represents better insulation. Fill power depends on several things, including the type of down used (such as more feathers, duck, or goose). Generally, a down jacket with a fill power of 550 and above is a good buy, and anything above 750 will provide excellent insulation. A down jacket with a higher fill power is also usually more compressible. Beside the jacket’s fill power, another number that is usually listed in a down jacket’s information is the percentage of down in comparison with regular small feathers in the jacket. The number may look something like this: 80/20, 90/10, and so on. The first number is the percentage of down in the jacket, while the second number is the percentage of feathers. The higher the first number, the better the quality of the down jacket.

A top of the line HASU use a 700 Fill with a 90/10 down/feather count.

Check the Weight of the Down Jacket

The buyer should purchase a down jacket according to his or her needs. If purchasing the jacket for use on backpacking journeys or travel outdoors, then a lighter down jacket would be a better buy since in this case the jacket will not weigh down on the wearer and slow down their speed. For general use though, a bulkier jacket may be all right. A down jacket with a 500 fill power will have to be bulkier and heavier than a down jacket of 700 fill power to offer the same kind of warmth. So for the lightest weight, it is preferable to buy jackets with higher fill powers.

A HASU down will be very light, generally less than 0.5kg and with a very high goose down count of 700 Fill the jacket remains extremely warm

Mind the Material

The two commonly used materials to form the outer layer of a down jacket is nylon as well as polyester, since they are durable and can withstand harsh conditions better. However, when purchasing a jacket, be sure to inspect the material to ensure that no feathers or down is poking out of it, as this means that the material is not sturdy enough to support the down material inside. To be very sure, compress the jacket and check again. If the material passes both these tests, then it is likely strong enough and will not degrade with wear. Also, try and buy a down jacket that has an extra layer laminated onto the fabric as this will increase the jacket’s ability to keep out water and keep the wearer dry and warm.

A HASU jacket has 3 layer’s on the surface fabric and a dual layer on the lining to prevent feathers showing and also remain windproof and water tight.

Construction Check

Down jackets are constructed in a number of different designs, including the tube wall design which has smaller baffles or compartments, or the box wall design where the jacket is constructed of two outer layers, as well as many others. There is dispute over which types of designs are better, but it does make sense that down jackets with larger compartments allow the down inside to bunch up with use, creating bald areas inside the jacket that allow cold air to pass through. It’s not just the stitching that the buyer must pay attention to; the buyer must ensure that the down jacket is made for use by either specifically a man or a woman, as women’s down jackets have a different construction than men’s ones. Therefore, do not attempt to purchase jackets that are made for men when the wearer is going to be a woman.

HASU use 90 separate chambers when constructing a jacket to keep the down in place and make sure that is remains well distributed. The back body panel alone has 13 separate chambers.

Check for Other Features

Many down jackets come with other features that should be examined like hoods, zips, pockets, adjustable hems, and so on. The buyer should think carefully if it is worth paying extra for such features. For example, a hood may not be convenient in situations where the buyer has to wear helmets or other kinds of headgear, but at the same time it may be useful to keep one’s ears and head warm and dry in the event of rain or heavy winds. As for zips, front zips should ideally have overlap panels so that the heat is not lost at the zipper area. A two-way zip may be helpful for better insulation as well.
Most down jackets have pockets either on the outside or inside, but some have pockets on both sides. The type of pockets that the jacket contains is what is important, not the number of pockets. If the buyer likes to keep things in her pockets, then perhaps zipped pockets would be a secure option. For women with hands that often get cold, on the other hand, having hand warmer pockets on the outside of the jacket will certainly be helpful.
So when it comes to features, usually more is better, but be sure to know first whether it is worth paying extra for such features.

HASU use lambskin on the corners of all pockets. All pockets are also lined with micro fleece for warmth. The front zip has double flaps to keep warmth locked in and the neck has a fully fleeced chin and neck support for added comfort.